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People get tattoos to honor their children, to show their fandom allegiance, and even to pledge their love to their significant other. But another ink-spiration we love is our pets. For some people, a furry companion is worthy of a permanent place on the skin — like the people in this gallery. Check out all of these fantastic animal tattoos, and then check out even more tattoo inspiration.
Although it’s hard to read in the photo, the wider shot shows you how script can work really well to join different tattoos. It sits below a cross themed tattoo, so is potentially a passage out of the bible that inspires or holds a dear meaning to the person. Script can work great on the leg and backs and also wraps around nicely. When opting for a script tattoo be sure to get someone that’s experience in doing nice lettering.
They say cats stand for the wilder side of nature, free and independent, enigmatic and mysterious. The ancient Egyptians considered the cat a god. A lunar creature, it represents the feminine, magic, night time, in contrast to the masculine and all that is solar. The total opposite of the dog, in fact, that other domestic animal par excellence, the symbol of loyalty and protection.
The popularity of the Koi fish tattoo goes back to an old Chinese and Japanese myth about a huge school of a thousand Koi fish swimming upstream in China's Yellow River. When the little guys reached a huge waterfall, most of the fish turned back. A few of the Koi stuck it out, however, and after 100 years, one of them finally succeeded in leaping to the top of the falls. It impressed the gods so much they turned him into a dragon. The Koi therefore symbolizes strength, bravery, and perseverance. 
Leave the colors to the artist. Hamlet suggests not bringing in a fully rendered drawing of the image and colors you want. The more I interview tattoo artists, the more I am coming to understand that getting a tattoo is like commissioning an artist to paint a mural. You do own the building, but you don't hand the artist a photo of another artist's mural and tell them to replicate it for you. Instead, you say your building works for peace and you want a mural that conveys that message and that you especially love lily of the valley flowers and the image of the rising sun. Then you let the artist do what they do: Create some art!
Dating back to 5,000 B.C., traditional Japanese tattoos, or Irezumi, are extensive pieces that cover large areas of the body and depict nature scenes beset by the opposing elements of fire and water. Uniting Japanese and Chinese mythologies, traditional Japanese tattooing venerates the sacred nature of certain animals. Spreading far beyond the islands of Japan, this beautiful style of tattooing can be found on collectors from around the globe.
As with any tattoo, you’ll need to keep your bandages on for a few hours, then Gualteros says to wash the tattoo with antibacterial soap and water, let it air dry for 10 minutes, and put a thin layer of Aquaphor on it after each shower for the first two days. (Then switch to unscented body lotion.) While the tattoo heals, wash it 2-3 times a day until peeling stops. This usually takes one week. Continue with light layers of unscented lotion.
Another common smaller tattoo for people to get is a simple letter. The letter P may symbolise the persons first name, someone’s name that’s important to them or even the periodic symbol for Phosphorus. There are thousands of fonts to choose from and luckily with letters it’s easy to test them out on your computer before you pick which one will look best.
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